Saturday, May 28, 2016

North America Nakba Tour: Exiled Palestinians, Berkeley 2016





NORTH AMERICA NAKBA TOUR: THE EXILED PALESTINIANS

 – DIRECT FROM THE REFUGEE CAMPS –

Jewish Voice for Peace-East Bay, South Alameda County Peace & Justice Committee, Ecumenical Peace Institute, Friends of Sabeel North America,
in cooperation with the Free Palestine Movement, International Solidarity Movement-Northern California and al-Awda Palestine Right to Return Coalition
invite you to
North America Nakba Tour
The Exiled Palestinians
Stateless Palestinians from the Camps in Lebanon
video-prw
Mariam Fathalla interview (9-min. version)
video-prw
Mariam lFathalla interview (2-min. version)
On May 14, 1948, as Zionist leader David Ben Gurion was proclaiming a Jewish state in Palestine, his troops drove out the inhabitants of the ancient Palestinian town of al-Zeeb. 18-year-old Mariam Fathalla was one of them. She and her young husband fled to Lebanon. By year's end the 4,000-year-old community had been leveled. More than half of all Palestinians were killed or expelled and more than half the cities, towns and villages disappeared, a crime that Palestinians call al-Nakba (the Catastrophe).
datauri-fileNow 86 years old, Mariam has spent the last 68 years in crowded, makeshift refugee camps in Lebanon. She has raised three generations, all waiting to return to Palestine. She has seen five Israeli invasions of Lebanon, as well as the 1976 Tel al-Zaatar camp massacre that killed more than 2000 refugees there.
Mariam wants meet you.  So does Amena Ashkar, the great granddaughter of other Nakba survivors.  They have a different message.  They do not live in Palestine.  They have no citizenship anywhere.  They do not live under Israeli occupation. Israel does not allow them to visit their homes, much less live there.  Amena has never met an Israeli, and Mariam not since 1948. They have a different perspective.
VENUE: St. John's Presbyterian Church
TIME: Friday, June 3, 7:00 p.m.
LOCATION: 2727 College Ave., Berkeley (Berkeley BART)
CONTACT: 510-236-4250, solidarity@ism-norcal.org
FREE EVENT
-donations to support tour expenses gratefully accepted-

Vernon Masayesva 'Hopi and Tewa Demand Halt to Water Negotiations'

Vernon Masayesva, the former chairman of the Hopi tribe and founder and director of the Black Mesa Trust. Photograph: Sam A Minkler

A No Is A NO!
"Hopi Tribal Council and Chairman without consulting with villages have agreed to resume settlement negotiation against the will of the village they represent. We, the Hopi and Tewa people, demand and have a right to know why council decided to resume negotiations. Until a meeting is held, ALL settlement negotiations must end." -- Vernon Masayesva

By Vernon Masayesva
Censored News
Letter to the Editor
Former Chairmen: Ben Nuvamsa, Ivan Sidney, and Former Vice Chairmen: Phillip Quotshytewa Sr., Clifford Quotsakwahu, Caleb Johnson others wrote a letter to the Hopi Tribal Council on November 12, 2012 rejecting the Senate Bill 2109 sponsored by Former Senator Jon Kyle. Copies of the letter were sent to Arizona congressional delegation, DOI Secretary Ken Salazar and Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs, Kevin Washburn.
Subsequently leaders of Shungopavi, Hotevilla, Lower Moencopi, Bacavi, Kykotsmovi, Walpi, First Mesa Consolidated Villages and Mishongnovi adopted resolutions to reject Kyle Bill S 2109.ku
Then on June 15, 2012 at a Council meeting held at Hotevilla the Council voted to reject Kyle Bill SB 2109. Voting to kill Kyle Bill were; Herman Honanie, David Pecusa, Gayver Puhuyesva, Nada Talaqyuimptewa, Carlene Quotskuyva, Rebekah Masayesva, Danny Honanie, Bruce Fredericks, Leroy Sumatskuku, Wayne Kuwanhoyouma, and Danny Humetewa. Voted for the Kyle Bill were Alph Secakuku, Cedric Kuwaninvaya and George Mase with Chairman Leroy Shingoitewa presiding and not voting.
The Kyle Little Colorado Rights Water Settlement Bill, which if it had passed, would have allowed all non-water users to keep using the water they presently now use. What is left over will go to Navajo Nation, and not one drop will go to Hopi.
Hopi Tribal Council and Chairman without consulting with villages have agreed to resume settlement negotiation against the will of the village they represent.
We, the Hopi and Tewa people, demand and have a right to know why council decided to resume negotiations. Until a meeting is held, ALL settlement negotiations must end.
Vernon Masayesva
Cc: Hopi Tribal Council
Hopi Village Community Offices

Also see:
Benjamin Nuvamsa 'Grassroots Hopi and Tewa Senom Defense of Water Rights'
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/05/benjamin-nuvamsa-grassroots-hopi-and.html

Former Sen. Kyl's planned theft of water rights: This leaked doc in 2012 to Censored News shows how former Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl planned to steal Navajo and Hopi water rights by pushing legislation through a lame duck Congress. Interior Sec. Salazar was part of the planned theft of water rights, and Salazar resigned soon after. http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2012/11/leaked-documents-mainstream-media.html


Vernon Masayesva


Executive Director
Executive Director
Vernon Masayesva
Vernon Masayesva is the Executive Director of Black Mesa Trust, a Hopi Leader of the Coyote Clan and a former Chairman of the Hopi Tribal Council from the village of Hotevilla, one of the oldest continuously inhabited human settlement in the Americas in Arizona.
Masayesva received his B.A. degree from Arizona State University in Political Science and a Masters of Arts from Central Michigan University in 1970. He returned to Black Mesa of the Hotevilla Bacavi Community School, the first Indian controlled school on Hopi as the lead educator of the school systems. In 1984, he was elected to the Hopi Tribal Council and then served as Chairman from 1989. He immersed himself in the tangled intricacies of the mining on Black Mesa and the Hopi – Navajo land dispute, and is widely respected on and off the reservation.
In 1998, he founded the Black Mesa Trust and currently serves as its Executive Director. Vernon is an international speaker on the subject of Water and is honored among many scientists, physicists and water researchers including renown author and water researcher Dr. Masaru Emoto from Japan.  Among other things, he is beginning a serious study of Hopi symbols and metaphors to understand who he is and what he can do to help his people lay a vision of a future Hopi society. As a result of his commitment to preserving our water, former President William Clinton honored him as an “Environmental Hero.” Charles Wilkinson, a distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Colorado said, “You will gain a strong sense of history, of millennia, from listening to Vernon, but my guess is you will also see something else-the future-for Vernon embodies personal qualities and philosophical attitudes that can serve our whole society well in the challenging years that lie ahead.”
To learn more about Black Mesa Trust visit www.blackmesatrust.org

Benjamin Nuvamsa: Grassroots Hopi and Tewa Senom Defense of Water Rights


"The Hopi Tribal Council is not informing the Hopi and Tewa Senom of what it is doing ... Sens. John McCain and Jeff Flake, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and others are determined to take our water rights away. Former Sen. Jon Kyl tried hard before he retired." -- Former Hopi Chairman Benjamin Nuvamsa



By Benjamin Nuvamsa
Censored News

To the editor,
June 15, 2012 was a historic day for the Hopi Tribe. On this day, the Hopi and Tewa Senom stood in solidarity as “One Nation: One Voice” to oppose the proposed Senate Bill 2109, the Navajo and Hopi Little Colorado River Water Rights Act of 2012. The Hopi Tribal Council passed Resolution No. H-072-2012 to formally oppose the bill.
Resolution H-072-2012 provides that further and separate negotiations shall not continue without full and open consultation with the Hopi and Tewa Villages, Hopi Senom and the Hopi Tribal Council.
Sadly, however, the Hopi Tribal Council, in a unilateral action, purported to “repeal” the resolution June 21, 2012 by passing Resolution H-073-2012. This resolution provided support for Senate Bill 2109. It was sponsored by George Mase, former Sipaulovi representative and chairman of the Water & Energy Team, and was endorsed by former tribal Chairman LeRoy Shingoitewa.
Then on Dec. 18, 2012, the Hopi Tribal Council voted to repeal Resolution H-073-2012.
Today, we see press releases and news articles with pictures of tribal Chairman Herman Honanie and members of the Water & Energy Team touting collaboration with other parties in negotiating our Little Colorado River water rights. But as noted in Resolution H-072-2012, Honanie and the Hopi Water & Energy Team are in direct violation of the mandates of the Hopi and Tewa Senom. Yes, Resolution H- 072-2012 is still in effect because the Hopi and Tewa Senom, village governments, traditional leaders and former tribal chairmen and vice chairmen were not consulted and did not authorize the tribal council to repeal their resolution.
This means the Hopi Tribal Council does not have the authority to continue current negotiations and to spend the tribe’s money on attorneys. It means the Hopi Tribal Council must provide full and open consultation with the Hopi and Tewa Senom, village governments and traditional leaders. It means members of the Hopi Tribe must vote in a referendum on any offer to settle the water rights. This further means the Hopi Tribal Council does not have authority to accept or reject any proposed settlement.
Our villages are the rightful owners of water rights since time immemorial. Water right is a sacred right. It is a property right of the villages and any wrongful taking of this right without just compensation is a violation under federal and tribal laws.
The Hopi Tribal Council is not informing the Hopi and Tewa Senom of what it is doing. The tribal council is not consulting with village governments, village leaders and Hopi tribal members on matters important to the tribe. In this respect, the tribal council is in violation of the Hopi tribal constitution.
Sens. John McCain and Jeff Flake, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and others are determined to take our water rights away. Former Sen. Jon Kyl tried hard before he retired.
As Hopi and Tewa Senom, we must protect the future of our people and make sure the tribal council does not enter into any settlement that will impair our future and compromise our village aboriginal and sovereign water rights.
Benjamin H. Nuvamsa
Former Hopi Tribal Chairman Village of Shungopavi

Also see:
Vernon Masayesva: "Hopi and Tewa Demand Halt to Water Negotiations'
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/05/vernon-masayesva-hopi-and-tewa-demand.html


Former Sen. Kyl's planned theft of water rights: This leaked doc in 2012 to Censored News shows how former Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl planned to steal Navajo and Hopi water rights by pushing legislation through a lame duck Congress. Interior Sec. Salazar was part of the planned theft of water rights, and Salazar resigned soon after. http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2012/11/leaked-documents-mainstream-media.html

Friday, May 27, 2016

Acoma Pueblo Gov. to France: Return Sacred Items to Homeland

Pueblo of Acoma Gov. Kurt Riley, center, accompanied by Pueblo of Acoma Traditional Leader Conroy Chino,  contests sale of sacred items. (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)



US Media and Indian Country Media: Billionaires and Fraud at Core of News

Billionaires take control of mainstream news, while big money, fraud and plagiarism infect Indian country news


By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

The New York Times reveals how billionaires have taken control of much of the US media -- billionaires tied to politicians, casinos, the Mormon Church, sports teams, and more.
The New York Times article does not cover how the national Indian country media is now controlled by casino dollars and relies primarily on stay-at-home plagiarizers.
Jacqueline Keeler, Native reporter recently fired by Indian Country Today, reveals how Indian Country Today is now controlled by a non-Indian editor that previously worked as an editor at Playboy.
Censored News was created 10 years ago, after I was censored and then terminated, after working as a longtime staff reporter for Indian Country Today.
Integrity does matter, especially at the foundation of journalism and the pursuit of truth.
The New York Times does not identify one of the billionaire owners of the news media. It is Indian Country Today, owned by the Oneida Indian Nation in New York, which operates a billion dollar casino industry.
The collapse of the national news in the United States, and particularly in Indian country, can also be seen as part of the death of the old system. The current journalism is taking its last gulps, using Internet fraud, plagiarism and deception, particularly on Facebook, to confuse, distract and misinform with stolen news, and fake news. 
Meanwhile, in the mainstream news, each day the bloated old news media and its new billionaire owners want to influence you, shape your opinions, and shape the US and the world with fraud.

Read more:

New York Times: \http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/28/business/media/behind-the-scenes-billionaires-growing-control-of-news.html

Facebook is full of clickbait. These fraudulent websites steal the hard work of real reporters, and post it for advertising or ad word revenues. Each time you click on the link, these frauds make money. Read more about clickbait: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clickbai

Brenda Norrell, publisher of Censored News, has been a news reporter in Indian country for 34 years. During the 18 years that she lived on the Navajo Nation, she worked as a reporter for Navajo Times, and a stringer for AP and USA Today. She served as a staff reporter for Indian Country Today for most of the years between 1995 and 2006. After being censored, then terminated, by Indian Country Today, she created Censored News as a service to grassroots Indigenous Peoples and human rights struggles.
During the past decade, she has traveled with the Zapatistas, reported from the Mother Earth Conference in Bolivia, and reported live for five months, with Govinda at Earthcycles grassroots radio, on the Longest Walk 2 northern route in 2008.
The live coverage over the past decade included the Peltier and Boarding School Tribunals in Green Bay, Wisconsin, and Native American summits across the West.

All content on Censored News is copyrighted by individual authors and photographers.

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Sacred Stone Camp: Human Shield Blocking Access to Dakota Access Pipeline


Human Shield of Prayer Moves in Front of Dakota Access Pipeline Construction!

Posted on May 24, 2016
May 24, 2016 – Camp of the Sacred Stones, Cannon Ball, North Dakota
Indigenous Rising

Today, in opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline and the illegal start of  its construction in North Dakota, a human shield of prayer has moved in front of the construction site northeast of Cannon Ball, ND on the east bank of the Missouri River. The human shield of prayer is on United States Army Corp of Engineer property.
[The Dakota Access Pipeline is a proposed 1,168-mile, 30-inch diameter pipeline that will connect the Bakken and Three Forks production areas in North Dakota to Patoka, Illinois, transporting over 450,000 barrels of oil per day.]
These land defenders plan to stay at the construction site in an display of non-violent prayerful action as long as possible.
Oceti Sakowin water protectors before they cross the Missouri River to create a human shield against Dakota Access pipeline construction
Oceti Sakowin water protectors before they cross the Missouri River to create a human shield against Dakota Access pipeline construction.


THE FOLLOWING IS A STATEMENT BY THE WARRIORS WHO WILL BE ENGAGING IN NON-VIOLENT DIRECT ACTION AT THE DAKOTA ACCESS CONSTRUCTION SITE:
We are telling the Army Corp of Engineers that they have a trust responsibility to the Oceti Sakowin. That without water there is no life. To deny the permit for Dakota Access now and be good stewards of the land they stole from us which by law is still ours.
“We are headed across the river to the route of Dakota Access to pray. Remaining non-violent to any obstacle that we may face,” says Wiyaka Eagleman, Sicangu Lakota, Elsevier S.D.
“Today I’m going over the river to pray hard and as long as I can for the people to have a change of heart to stop this pipeline,” says Jeremiah Canku Maza, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe
“I stand strong with my relationship in this area. I am here to remind people of who’s land that we are truly protecting. The water, land, animals and air. They give us life. Greed kills. No more pipelines. Honor the treaties,” says Tania Aubid
“We are here to stop a snake who wants to cross the Missouri river. This is Oceti Sakowin treaty territory. No one asked for our input. No Dakota Access pipeline. America is built on stolen lands,” says Justin Rowland from the Fire Lightening Band of the Oglala
The Army Corp of Engineers is expected to make a decision soon. We want a full EIS, we want this pipeline to be denied. We want the world to know we stand on our treaty rights and for all the people who drink the water from the Missouri and use it for fishing, and recreation. Life is more important than a pipeline.
Direction Sign to the "Sacred Stone Camp" near Cannonball, ND
Direction Sign to the “Sacred Stone Camp” near Cannonball, ND
Dakota Access Pipeline Construction Site in ND. Northeast of Cannon Ball, ND across the Missouri River.
Dakota Access Pipeline Construction Site in ND. Northeast of Cannon Ball, ND across the Missouri River.


To Support the Sacred Stone Camp and those fighting against Dakota Access Pipeline click here: https://www.gofundme.com/sacredstonecamp
Sign the petition to the Army Corps of Engineers: https://www.change.org/p/jo-ellen-darcy-stop-the-dakota-access-pipeline


Sacred Stone Camp: Human Shield on Standing Rock in North Dakota is blocking construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline which is threatening the water sources of the Dakota, Lakota and Dakota.
More information:

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

AIM West: 'Broken Rainbow' film and Louise Benally: Oakland May 25, 2016



Monday, May 23, 2016

Houma Native to Speak out at Shell Annual Meeting: Netherlands May 24, 2016


Photo  Monique Verdin by Andy Cook
Keep it in the Ground: Intervention from Gulf of Mexico Indigenous Delegate at Shell Annual General Meeting
Photo opportunity outside the Annual General Meeting (AGM): Circustheater, Circusstraat 4, The Hague, The Netherlands, Tuesday, May 24, 2016, 9 am local time.
For interviews with delegate contact:
Suzanne Dhaliwal, UK Tar Sands Network  0044 777 269 4327 suzanne@no-tar-sands.org
Monique Verdin, 001 504 330 0768, moniquemverdin@gmail.com
WHAT: Indigenous delegate from the Gulf of Mexico will speak out against offshore drilling at the Shell AGM 2016, and will present a pop-up exhibition of 10 foot professional photos documenting climate impacts on communities of New Orleans. An action will also take place in the Gulf coast on May 24th to amplify the Shell AGM intervention, as residents call for an end to the US federal government sale of ocean drilling leases.
Monique Verdin, resident of the Louisiana coast and member-elect of the Houma Nation Council will travel to the Shell AGM in the Netherlands, supported by the Indigenous Environmental Network and UK Tar Sands Network to call on the board and investors to put an end to new offshore leases in the Gulf of Mexico in light of the history of environmental devastation in the Gulf and its related community impacts, as well as the recent 90,000 gallon Shell oil spill. The ecology and local economy of this region is still reeling from the impacts of the BP Deepwater Horizon Disaster in 2010.
WHO:  Monique Verdin is an indigenous daughter of southeast Louisiana’s Houma Nation, and is a photographer and filmmaker.
“Multinational corporations continue to drill off our coast, while the federal government is putting more offshore lands onto the auction block than ever before. This is absurd. The only way to ensure we protect the water and sanctity of life in and along the Gulf Coast is to put an end to extreme fossil fuel development. Oil and gas infrastructure, from pipelines to wells to refineries, are gambling with the health of our environment and the wellness of our communities along the coast. We need immediate action to facilitate just transitions and the ability to ensure we keep carbon in the ground for our communities across the Gulf and for communities around the planet.” Monique Verdin
As a Hurricane Katrina evacuation veteran and a witness to Deepwater Horizon disaster, Monique was inspired to become an active community organizer to oppose new leases in the Gulf. Her stunning photographs document this devastation. The indigenous people of the Mississippi River Delta are witnessing rapid land loss due to rising seas and an eroding landscape desecrated by fossil fuel mining and manipulations. Monique documents this as a personal journey in her film ‘My Louisiana Love’ (2012) which has been screened internationally.
WHY: Coastal communities in the Gulf of Mexico oppose Shell’s exploration of new leases of offshore drilling, the risks of deepwater drilling as evidenced by the recent Shell oil spill in the Gulf this month, and the impacts of climate change on coastal communities. These communities also experience impacts of explosions, poor air quality, and failure from Shell to address these concerns.
Monique participated in the Break Free actions in Washington DC on Monday, May 16th, 2016.

Censored News PayPal


Thanks for reading Censored News for the past 10 years! I've depleted all my funds to keep Censored News going. Please donate to help provide Internet access for Censored News! Censored News has no advertising, grants or sponsors, and depends on reader donations! Thank you! Brenda Norrell, PMB 132, 405 E Wetmore Rd, Ste 117, Tucson, Ariz. 85705 brendanorrell@gmail.com